Antennaria dioica rubra – Red Pussytoes
Antennaria dioica rubra – Red Pussytoes

Availavle for shipping Mid May.

This native groundcover is ideal for xeriscaping; fuzzy silver leaves and rising pink flowers make this a unique addition to rock and alpine gardens; serves as a food source for the caterpillar for the Painted Lady butterfly

Ornamental Features:

Red Pussytoes features tiny balls of pink flowers at the ends of the stems from late spring to early summer, which emerge from distinctive rose flower buds. It's attractive small tomentose narrow leaves remain grayish green in color throughout the year. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes:

Red Pussytoes is an herbaceous evergreen perennial with a ground-hugging habit of growth. It brings an extremely fine and delicate texture to the garden composition and should be used to full effect.

This is a relatively low maintenance perennial, and should not require much pruning, except when necessary, such as to remove dieback. Deer don't particularly care for this plant and will usually leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Red Pussytoes is recommended for the following landscape applications;

Rock/Alpine Gardens
Mass Planting
Naturalizing And Woodland Gardens
General Garden Use
Border Edging
Groundcover
Plant Characteristics:

Red Pussytoes will grow to be only 2 inches tall at maturity extending to 4 inches tall with the flowers, with a spread of 12 inches. Its foliage tends to remain low and dense right to the ground. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 5 years.

This perennial should only be grown in full sunlight. It prefers dry to average moisture levels with very well-drained soil, and will often die in standing water. It is considered to be drought-tolerant, and thus makes an ideal choice for a low-water garden or xeriscape application. It is not particular as to soil pH, but grows best in poor soils. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This plant can be propagated by division.

This is a selection of a native North American species.

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Asclepias incarnata – ‘Cinderella’ Milkweed
Asclepias incarnata – ‘Cinderella’ Milkweed

‘Cinderella’ is a cultivar of native Asclepias incarnata (Swamp Milkweed) featuring pale pink, vanilla scented flower clusters. This milkweed occurs throughout most of the United States. It is a tall plant found in moist habitats such as wet meadows, floodplains, riverbanks, pond shores, stream banks, wet woods, swamps, and marshes, although it will also grow in drier areas such as prairies, fields, and roadsides. Swamp milkweed needs full sun or partial shade to flourish. Flowers are very attractive to butterflies and bees as a nectar source. Swamp milkweed is also an important food source for the larval stage of Monarch butterflies.The plants are deer resistant and heat tolerant.

Available –  May 2017
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Asclepias incarnata – Swamp Milkweed
Asclepias incarnata – Swamp Milkweed

Swamp Milkweed occurs throughout most of the United States. It is a tall plant found in moist habitats such as wet meadows, floodplains, riverbanks, pond shores, stream banks, wet woods, swamps, and marshes, although it will also grow in drier areas such as prairies, fields, and roadsides. Swamp milkweed needs full sun or partial shade to flourish. Flowers are fragrant and very attractive to hummingbirds, butterflies and bees as a nectar source. Swamp milkweed is also an important food source for the larval stage of Monarch butterflies. The plants are deer resistant and heat tolerant. Also known as Rose Milkweed, Red Milkweed, and Marsh Milkweed.

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Asclepias incarnata – Swamp Milkweed – 1 gallon pot
Asclepias incarnata – Swamp Milkweed – 1 gallon pot

Host Plant – Monarch

Red Milkweed attracts butterflies of all kinds and the leaves are a preferred food source for the Monarch Caterpillar.Asclepias incarnata thrives along ponds, streams and detention basins. It preferes moist soil but also does wel in average, well-drained garden sites. Full sun is best and some light shade is tolerated. No butterfly garden is complete without Red Milkweed, also known as Swamp Milkweed or Marsh Milkweed.

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Asclepias incarnata – Swamp Milkweed – 4″ pot
Asclepias incarnata – Swamp Milkweed – 4″ pot

Host Plant – Monarch

Asclepias incarnata Swamp Milkweed occurs throughout most of the United States. It is a tall plant found in moist habitats such as wet meadows, floodplains, riverbanks, pond shores, stream banks, wet woods, swamps, and marshes, although it will also grow in drier areas such as prairies, fields, and roadsides. Swamp milkweed needs full sun or partial shade to flourish. Flowers are fragrant and very attractive to hummingbirds, butterflies and bees as a nectar source. Swamp milkweed is also an important food source for the larval stage of Monarch butterflies. The plants are deer resistant and heat tolerant. Also known as Rose Milkweed, Red Milkweed, and Marsh Milkweed.

Available – May 2017

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Asclepias sullivantii – Sullivant’s Milkweed / Prairie Milkweed
Asclepias sullivantii – Sullivant’s Milkweed / Prairie Milkweed

Winner of the 2015 Green Thumb Award for Best New Product!

Also known as Prairie Milkweed, Sullivant’s Milkweed is a long-lived perennial and a well-behaved relative of Common Milkweed. Very similar in appearance, it is less aggressive and an excellent choice for butterfly gardens. Prairie Milkweed grows best in a sunny, medium to medium-moist garden. The pinkish, mauve flowers are very fragrant and attract hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. Sullivant’s Milkweed is listed as ‘threatened’ in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan.

Available – May 2017

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Asclepias syriaca – Common Milkweed
Asclepias syriaca – Common Milkweed

Asclepias syriaca Common Milkweed is the plant most people think of when they hear the word ‘milkweed’.  This Michigan native occurs throughout most of the United States and thrives in almost any well drained soil and produces a profusion of fragrant mauve colored flowers in midsummer.  The sweet scented flowers attract hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, and other pollinators and beneficial insects. Of all the milkweeds this is the easiest and fastest to establish, yet it is known to be invasive and must be used with care. This milkweed grows best in full sun and average to well-drained soil with no irrigation and will tolerate extreme conditions.

Available May 2017

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Aster dumosus –  ‘Wood’s Pink’ Dwarf Aster
Aster dumosus – ‘Wood’s Pink’ Dwarf Aster

Densely packed clusters of clear light blue flowers provide outstanding color in the garden from late summer into fall. Since this species has a dwarf, compact habit, it will not require staking. 'Wood's' selections have shown excellent resistance to mildew and rust.

Asters are excellent cut flowers and attract butterflies. They make a terrific accent to fall blooming grasses and the changing colors of the trees. They are native to North America and are generally very easy to grow.

 

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Echinacea pallida – Pale Purple Coneflower
Echinacea pallida – Pale Purple Coneflower

Host Plant – Silvery Checkerspot

Pale Purple Coneflower should be planted in well-drained soil in full to partial sunlight. Most native Coneflowers dislike soil that is kept excessively moist or has poor drainage and they will start to rot in these situations. Once the taproot is established it is extremely drought-tolerant and needs little care, but then also may be difficult to move. In the past all of the Purple Coneflowers were used as medicinal plants by the Native Americans. There is still a market for the roots, which are used to make herbal medicines and tonics.

Pale Purple Coneflower grows up to 3′ feet tall and has very pale purple to pink flowers.  It blooms in early summer when only a few of the sun loving plants are in bloom and provides nectar for hummingbirds and butterflies, and the leaves provide food for the Ottoe-skipper larva.  Also easy-to-establish and a prairie icon is its cousin, Echinacea pallida Pale Purple Coneflower, which has a deeper purple flower and will bloom just at the tail end of Pale Purple Coneflower’s bloom cycle.  Planting these two together will give you many, many weeks of  Echinacea blooms.

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Echinacea paradoxa – Ozark Coneflower
Echinacea paradoxa – Ozark Coneflower

Host Plant – Silvery Checkerspot

Relatively rare in the wild and in cultivation, this coneflower is stunning in summer and flowers for an extended period. It’s bright pure yellow flowers consist of drooping petals surrounding a soft brown cone. Butterflies and other beneficials will flock to the flowers for nectar. Goldfinches devoured the seeds in late summer and fall. 

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Eupatorium fistulosum - Joe Pye weed
Eupatorium fistulosum – Joe Pye Weed

Joe Pye weed or trumpetweed – Available for shipping mid May
(syn. Eutrochium fistulosum)
Trumpetweed is a robust, upright perennial with hollow purple stems accented by huge, rounded, tight clusters of pink or purplish-mauve flowers. It is an important pollen and nectar plant and attracts butterflies (particularly the swallowtail butterfly) and other pollinaters by the dozens. Its height makes it an excellent backround plant in border perennial beds, but is also majestic standing alone. Flower color is darker in cooler weather.

Joe Pye weed Interesting Notes
The genus Eupatorium is named after Mithridates VI Eupator (c. 120-63 BC) the most powerful king of Pontus, who may have used a plant in the genus as a remedy, or perhaps an antidote, as he was known to have ingested small amounts of many types of poison in order to attain immunity. The species name fistulosum refers to the hollow stem. The Joe Pye of the common name is that of a character in 19th-century New England who may have been a Native American healer (real name Zhopai?) or a white promoter of Indian themes. At any rate he is credited with using Joe-Pye Weed to cure settlers of typhus by sweating them.

Eupatorium fistulosum Growing and Maintenance Tips
Moist or wet soil is preferred, although Joe Pye Weed is known to grow just about anywhere. Spreads by underground rhizomes. Eupatorium is most typically propagated by division but is just as easily transplanted. Division, as well as thinning should be done frequently to ensure vigorous growth and reduce spread. Cuttings may also be rooted. Eupatorium ssp. in general benefit from fertilization throughtout the growing season. Staking is also helpful for support.

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Phlox paniculata Eva Cullum
Phlox paniculata – ‘Eva Cullum’

Culture

Grow in moderately fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to light shade. Best in full sun. Prefers rich, moist, organic soils. Needs good air circulation (space well and thin out stems as needed) to help combat potential powdery mildew problems. Intolerant of drought and needs to be watered in dry spells. Avoid overhead watering however. Appreciates a summer mulch which helps keep the root zone cool. Remove faded flower panicles to prolong bloom period and to prevent unwanted self-seeding (cultivars generally do not come true from seed).

Noteworthy Characteristics

Phlox paniculata, commonly known as garden phlox, is native from New York to Iowa south to Georgia, Mississippi and Arkansas. It has escaped gardens and naturalized into areas beyond its original native range. This is an upright perennial that grows in a clump to 2-4' tall and to 2-3' wide on stiff stems clad with conspicuously veined, opposite, pointed, elliptic, deep green leaves (to 4-6″ long). Fragrant, tubular, pink-purple to white florets (to 3/4” diameter) are densely packed in large, tiered, domed terminal clusters (to 6-8″) over a long July to September bloom period. Each individual floret has a long corolla tube and five flat petal-like lobes. Butterflies love the flowers.

A large number of garden phlox cultivars in flower colors including white, lavender, pink, rose, red and bi-color are available in commerce. Cultivars resistant to powdery mildew are often the best choices.

The genus name of Phlox is derived from the Greek word for flame.

'Eva Cullum' is a garden phlox cultivar that typically grows in an upright clump to 2-3' tall. Fragrant, tubular flowers (1/2″ to 1″ diameter) with long corolla tubes and five flat petal-like lobes are pink with dark pink eyes. Individual flowers are densely arranged in large, terminal, pyramidal clusters (panicles to 6-12″ long) in summer atop stiff, upright stems which seldom need staking. Long mid to late summer bloom sometimes extends into early fall. Narrow, opposite, pointed, lance-shaped leaves (to 5″ long). Good fresh cut flower. An introduction of Blooms of Bressingham in England (Eva Cullum was a former department head at Bloom's Nursery).

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