Monarda ‘Petite Delight’
Monarda ‘Petite Delight’

Culture

Most hybrids are of Monarda didyma parentage and are easily grown in average, medium to wet, moisture retentive soils in full sun to part shade. Those of Monarda fistulosa parentage are more tolerant of drier soils. Prefers rich, humusy soils in full sun, but appreciates some afternoon shade in hot summer climates such as the St. Louis area. Soils must not be allowed to dry out. Remove spent flowers to improve plant appearance and possibly to prolong bloom. Divide clumps every 3-4 years to prevent overcrowding and to control mildly spreading tendencies (slowly spreads by rhizomes). Provide plants with good air circulation to help combat fungal leaf diseases.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Monarda is a genus of about 15 species of annuals and herbaceous perennials from prairies and woodlands in North America. They flower from mid-summer to early fall and are loved by bees, hummingbirds and other pollinators.

Genus name honors Nicholas Monardes (1493-1588), physician and botanist of Seville.

Some monardas are commonly called beebalm in reference to a prior use of the leaves as a balm for bee stings.

‘Petite Delight’ is a compact beebalm cultivar that typically grows to only 12-15” tall with an oval to rounded habit. Tubular, two-lipped, lavender-rose flowers are borne in dense, globular, terminal heads atop stiff square stems clad with serrate, shiny, ovate-lanceolate, dark green leaves (to 2” long). Long summer bloom period (July-August in St. Louis). Attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds, particularly when massed. Flowers, stems and leaves are aromatic. U. S. Plant Patent #10,784 issued February 9, 1999.

Problems

Powdery mildew can be a serious problem with some of the monardas. Susceptibility to foliar diseases in general increases if plants are grown in dry soils or are allowed to dry out. Rust is also an occasional problem.

This cultivar reportedly has good mildew resistance.

Garden Uses

Perennial borders, cottage gardens, herb gardens, moist sunny areas along streams or ponds. Also effective in containers.

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Monarda ‘Petite Wonder’
Monarda ‘Petite Wonder’

Culture

Most hybrids are of Monarda didyma parentage and are easily grown in average, medium to wet, moisture retentive soils in full sun to part shade. Those of Monarda fistulosa parentage are more tolerant of drier soils. Prefers rich, humusy soils in full sun, but appreciates some afternoon shade in hot summer climates such as the St. Louis area. Soils must not be allowed to dry out. Remove spent flowers to improve plant appearance and possibly to prolong bloom. Divide clumps every 3-4 years to prevent overcrowding and to control mildly spreading tendencies (slowly spreads by rhizomes). Provide plants with good air circulation to help combat fungal leaf diseases.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Monarda is a genus of about 15 species of annuals and herbaceous perennials from prairies and woodlands in North America. They flower from mid-summer to early fall and are loved by bees, hummingbirds and other pollinators.

Genus name honors Nicholas Monardes (1493-1588), physician and botanist of Seville.

Some monardas are commonly called beebalm in reference to a prior use of the leaves as a balm for bee stings.

‘Petite Wonder’ is a dwarf version of the compact beebalm cultivar known as M. ‘Petite Delight’. It typically grows to only 9-10” tall with an oval to rounded habit. Tubular, two-lipped, light pink flowers are borne in dense, globular, terminal heads atop stiff square stems clad with serrate, shiny, dark green leaves (to 2” long). Long summer bloom period (July-August in St. Louis). Attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds, particularly when massed. Flowers, stems and leaves are aromatic. U. S. Plant Patent #13,149 issued October 29, 2002.

Problems

Powdery mildew can be a serious problem with some of the monardas. Susceptibility to foliar diseases in general increases if plants are grown in dry soils or are allowed to dry out. Rust is also an occasional problem.

This cultivar reportedly has good mildew resistance.

Garden Uses

Perennial borders, cottage gardens, herb gardens, moist sunny areas along streams or ponds. Also effective in containers.

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Passiflora Incarnata x cinnicata ‘Incense’
Passiflora Incarnata x cinnicata ‘Incense’

‘Incense’ Passionflower is a perennial climbing vine with three lobed leaves and very large and showy purple flowers over a long period in warm weather. It is a hybrid between our native Passiflora incarnata and the South American Passiflora cincinnata. It produces few fruit. A serious “attention grabber” when in flower.  It climbs by tendrils so plant on ample support in sunny location with good soil.

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Penstemon hirsutus – Penstemon
Penstemon hirsutus – Penstemon

Erect, hairy stems, usually several from the same rhizome, are 16-24 in. tall. Leaves are oblong. A woolly-stemmed plant with open, stalked clusters of lavender, trumpet-shaped flowers with white lips. The tubular, lipped flowers are very slender, about an inch long, and pale-violet flowers. The mouth is nearly closed by the arched base of the lower lip.

The Beardtongues are a very large group, and taxonomically so complex that separating the species is often difficult. This species is readily distinguished, however, by the downy nature of the stem. The common and scientific names refer to the tufted sterile stamen.

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Phlox paniculata Eva Cullum
Phlox paniculata – ‘Eva Cullum’

Culture

Grow in moderately fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to light shade. Best in full sun. Prefers rich, moist, organic soils. Needs good air circulation (space well and thin out stems as needed) to help combat potential powdery mildew problems. Intolerant of drought and needs to be watered in dry spells. Avoid overhead watering however. Appreciates a summer mulch which helps keep the root zone cool. Remove faded flower panicles to prolong bloom period and to prevent unwanted self-seeding (cultivars generally do not come true from seed).

Noteworthy Characteristics

Phlox paniculata, commonly known as garden phlox, is native from New York to Iowa south to Georgia, Mississippi and Arkansas. It has escaped gardens and naturalized into areas beyond its original native range. This is an upright perennial that grows in a clump to 2-4' tall and to 2-3' wide on stiff stems clad with conspicuously veined, opposite, pointed, elliptic, deep green leaves (to 4-6″ long). Fragrant, tubular, pink-purple to white florets (to 3/4” diameter) are densely packed in large, tiered, domed terminal clusters (to 6-8″) over a long July to September bloom period. Each individual floret has a long corolla tube and five flat petal-like lobes. Butterflies love the flowers.

A large number of garden phlox cultivars in flower colors including white, lavender, pink, rose, red and bi-color are available in commerce. Cultivars resistant to powdery mildew are often the best choices.

The genus name of Phlox is derived from the Greek word for flame.

'Eva Cullum' is a garden phlox cultivar that typically grows in an upright clump to 2-3' tall. Fragrant, tubular flowers (1/2″ to 1″ diameter) with long corolla tubes and five flat petal-like lobes are pink with dark pink eyes. Individual flowers are densely arranged in large, terminal, pyramidal clusters (panicles to 6-12″ long) in summer atop stiff, upright stems which seldom need staking. Long mid to late summer bloom sometimes extends into early fall. Narrow, opposite, pointed, lance-shaped leaves (to 5″ long). Good fresh cut flower. An introduction of Blooms of Bressingham in England (Eva Cullum was a former department head at Bloom's Nursery).

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Phlox paniculata ‘David’
Phlox paniculata ‘David’

Culture

Grow in moderately fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Best in full sun. Prefers rich, moist, organic soils. Also prefers moderate summer temperatures over the heat and humidity of the deep South. Needs good air circulation (space well and thin out stems as needed) to help combat potential powdery mildew problems. Intolerant of drought and needs to be watered in dry spells. Avoid overhead watering however. Appreciates a summer mulch which helps keep the root zone cool. For winter, cut plants to the ground and remove from the garden plus clean up all plant areas in order to minimize possible powdery mildew infection for the following growing season. Remove faded flower panicles to prolong bloom period and to prevent unwanted self-seeding (cultivars generally do not come true from seed).

Noteworthy Characteristics

Phlox paniculata, commonly known as garden phlox, is native from New York to Iowa south to Georgia, Mississippi and Arkansas. It has escaped gardens and naturalized into areas beyond its original native range. This is an upright perennial that grows in a clump to 2-4′ tall and to 2-3′ wide on stiff stems clad with conspicuously veined, opposite, pointed, elliptic, deep green leaves (to 4-6″ long). Fragrant, tubular, pink-purple to white florets (to 3/4” diameter) are densely packed in large, tiered, domed terminal clusters (to 6-8″) over a long July to September bloom period. Each individual floret has a long corolla tube and five flat petal-like lobes. Butterflies love the flowers.

A large number of garden phlox cultivars in flower colors including white, lavender, pink, rose, red and bi-color are available in commerce. Cultivars resistant to powdery mildew are often the best choices.

The genus name is derived from the Greek word phlox meaning flame in reference to the intense flower colors of some varieties.

Specific epithet refers to the plant bearing flowers in panicles.

‘David’ is a garden phlox cultivar that typically grows in an upright clump to 3-4′ tall. Fragrant, tubular flowers (1/2″ to 1″ diameter) with long corolla tubes and five flat petal-like lobes are pure white. Individual flowers are densely arranged in large, terminal, pyramidal clusters (panicles to 6-12″ long) in summer atop stiff, upright stems which seldom need staking. Long mid to late summer bloom sometimes extends into early fall. Narrow, opposite, pointed, lance-shaped leaves (to 5″ long). Good fresh cut flower.

Problems

Phlox is not always an easy plant to grow well. Phlox bugs, powdery mildew and root rot can be serious problems. Spider mites can also be a problem, particularly in hot, dry conditions. Taller stems may need staking.

By reputation, ‘David’ has good resistance to powdery mildew.

Garden Uses

Garden phlox is a staple of the perennial border. Mixes well with other perennials and provides long summer bloom. Regardless of flower color, garden phlox is attractive to hummingbirds and is a good selection for inclusion in a bird garden.

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Phlox paniculata ‘Flame Red’
Phlox paniculata ‘Flame Red’

Description:

Exceptionally long blooms of fragrant solid red flowers, on compact plants that tend to be bushier; suitable for containers or small perennial borders; good mildew resistance

Ornamental Features

Red Flame Garden Phlox features bold fragrant conical red star-shaped flowers at the ends of the stems from early summer to early fall. The flowers are excellent for cutting. Its narrow leaves remain emerald green in color throughout the season. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Red Flame Garden Phlox is a dense herbaceous perennial with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should be cut back in late fall in preparation for winter. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds to your yard. Gardeners should be aware of the following characteristic(s) that may warrant special consideration;

  • Disease

Red Flame Garden Phlox is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Container Planting

Planting & Growing

Red Flame Garden Phlox will grow to be about 24 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 20 inches apart. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 10 years.

This plant does best in full sun to partial shade. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This is a selection of a native North American species. It can be propagated by division; however, as a cultivated variety, be aware that it may be subject to certain restrictions or prohibitions on propagation.

Red Flame Garden Phlox is a fine choice for the garden, but it is also a good selection for planting in outdoor pots and containers. With its upright habit of growth, it is best suited for use as a ‘thriller’ in the ‘spiller-thriller-filler’ container combination; plant it near the center of the pot, surrounded by smaller plants and those that spill over the edges. Note that when growing plants in outdoor containers and baskets, they may require more frequent waterings than they would in the yard or garden.

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Phlox paniculata ‘Katherine’
Phlox paniculata ‘Katherine’

Culture

Grow in moderately fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Best in full sun. Prefers rich, moist, organic soils. Also prefers moderate summer temperatures over the heat and humidity of the deep South. Needs good air circulation (space well and thin out stems as needed) to help combat potential powdery mildew problems. Intolerant of drought and needs to be watered in dry spells. Avoid overhead watering however. Appreciates a summer mulch which helps keep the root zone cool. For winter, cut plants to the ground and remove from the garden plus clean up all plant areas in order to minimize possible powdery mildew infection for the following growing season. Remove faded flower panicles to prolong bloom period and to prevent unwanted self-seeding (cultivars generally do not come true from seed).

Noteworthy Characteristics

Phlox paniculata, commonly known as garden phlox, is native from New York to Iowa south to Georgia, Mississippi and Arkansas. It has escaped gardens and naturalized into areas beyond its original native range.  This is an upright perennial that grows in a clump to 2-4′ tall and to 2-3′ wide on stiff stems clad with conspicuously veined, opposite, pointed, elliptic, deep green leaves (to 4-6″ long). Fragrant, tubular, pink-purple to white florets (to 3/4” diameter) are densely packed in large, tiered, domed terminal clusters (to 6-8″) over a long July to September bloom period. Each individual floret has a long corolla tube and five flat petal-like lobes. Butterflies love the flowers.

A large number of garden phlox cultivars in flower colors including white, lavender, pink, rose, red and bi-color are available in commerce. Cultivars resistant to powdery mildew are often the best choices.

The genus name is derived from the Greek word phlox meaning flame in reference to the intense flower colors of some varieties.

Specific epithet refers to the plant bearing flowers in panicles.

‘Katherine’ is a garden phlox cultivar which typically grows in an upright clump to 2-2.5′ tall. Fragrant, tubular flowers (1/2″ to 1″ diameter) with long corolla tubes and five flat petal-like lobes are lilac blue with white central stars. Individual flowers are densely arranged in large, terminal, pyramidal clusters (panicles to 6-9″ long) atop stiff, upright stems which seldom need staking. Long mid to late summer bloom sometimes extends into early fall. Narrow, opposite, pointed, lance-shaped leaves (to 5″ long). Good fresh cut flower.

Problems

Phlox is not always an easy plant to grow well. Phlox bugs, powdery mildew and root rot can be serious problems. Spider mites can also be a problem, particularly in hot, dry conditions. Taller stems may need staking.

Garden Uses

Garden phlox is a staple of the perennial border. Mixes well with other perennials and provides long summer bloom. Regardless of flower color, garden phlox is attractive to hummingbirds and is a good selection for inclusion in a bird garden.

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Phlox paniculata ‘Laura’
Phlox paniculata ‘Laura’

Culture

Grow in moderately fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to light shade. Best in full sun. Prefers rich, moist, organic soils. Needs good air circulation (space well and thin out stems as needed) to help combat potential powdery mildew problems. Intolerant of drought and needs to be watered in dry spells. Avoid overhead watering however. Appreciates a summer mulch which helps keep the root zone cool. Remove faded flower panicles to prolong bloom period and to prevent unwanted self-seeding (cultivars generally do not come true from seed).

Noteworthy Characteristics

Phlox paniculata, commonly known as garden phlox, is native from New York to Iowa south to Georgia, Mississippi and Arkansas. It has escaped gardens and naturalized into areas beyond its original native range. In Missouri, it is typically found south of the Missouri River in moist or rich low woods, thickets, alluvial banks and gravel bars along streams and bluff bases (Steyermark). This is an upright perennial that grows in a clump to 2-4′ tall and to 2-3′ wide on stiff stems clad with conspicuously veined, opposite, pointed, elliptic, deep green leaves (to 4-6″ long). Fragrant, tubular, pink-purple to white florets (to 3/4” diameter) are densely packed in large, tiered, domed terminal clusters (to 6-8″) over a long July to September bloom period. Each individual floret has a long corolla tube and five flat petal-like lobes. Butterflies love the flowers.

A large number of garden phlox cultivars in flower colors including white, lavender, pink, rose, red and bi-color are available in commerce. Cultivars resistant to powdery mildew are often the best choices.

The genus name of Phlox is derived from the Greek word for flame.

‘Laura’ is a garden phlox cultivar which typically grows in an upright clump to 3-4′ tall. Fragrant, tubular flowers (1/2″ to 1 inch diameter) with long corolla tubes and five flat petal-like lobes are purple with white eyes. Individual flowers are densely arranged in large, terminal, pyramidal clusters (panicles to 6-12″ long) atop stiff, upright stems which seldom need staking. Long mid to late summer bloom sometimes extends into early fall. Narrow, opposite, pointed, lance-shaped leaves (to 5″ long). Good fresh cut flower.

Problems

Phlox is not always an easy plant to grow well. Powdery mildew and root rot can be serious problems. Spider mites and plant bugs can also be a problem, particularly in hot, dry conditions.

Garden Uses

Garden phlox is a staple of the perennial border. Mixes well with other perennials and provides long summer bloom. Regardless of flower color, garden phlox is attractive to hummingbirds and is a good selection for inclusion in a bird garden.

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Ratibida columnifera – Mexican Hat Plant
Ratibida columnifera – Mexican Hat Plant
  • Fine cut foliage with red and yellow flowers
  • Mounding habit
  • Does well in dry conditions

Fun, unique flowers dance above mounds of fine green foliage from June until frost.  The blooms feature long, prominent cones that give way to wide, reflexed petals in shades of deep reddish-brown, orange, and yellow.  This plant is by seed, so there will be variation in the red/yellow ratio in the flowers.  A native prairie plant, this dwarf variety of the species performs exceptionally well in heat and dry conditions.

Available for shipping mid May 2017

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Ratibida pinnata - Yellow Coneflower
Ratibida pinnata – Yellow Coneflower

Yellow Coneflower is native to dry prairies and savannas. It has stiff and rough-feeling coarse leaves, and showy yellow flowers which have droopy soft yellow rays. The cone-like green centers eventually change to a dark purple or brown. Many insects are attracted to this plant such as butterflies and bees. It grows and transplants very easily, is drought-tolerant, and makes an excellent cut flower.

Yellow Coneflower grows best in full sun to partial shade, and medium to dry-medium soil conditions. It blooms approximately from July to September.

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Rudbeckia Fulgida Goldsturm
Rudbeckia fulgida – ‘Goldsturm’ Black-eyed Susan

A garden classic with bold texture and upright habit. Bright gold petals with a deep brown cone highlight the garden in late summer. Each flower may last up to two weeks! Makes a wonderful and long lasting cut flower. Provides seeds in the winter for birds and nectar for butterflies. Beautiful and versatile, outstanding in mass plantings as well as perennial borders, meadows and prairie gardens.

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm' has been selected by the Perennial Plant Association as the 1999 Perennial Plant of the Year. Acclaimed internationally as one of the most popular perennials for the past fifty years, its bright golden-yellow flowers shine in gardens worldwide. In 1937 Heinrich Hagemann observed a glorious stand of Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii at Gebrueder Schuetz's nursery in the Czech Republic. Recognizing the superiority over other commonly-grown Rudbeckia species, Hagemann convinced his employer Karl Foerster of Potsdam, Germany to propagate his discovery. World War II interfered with the planned debut of the plant and it was not until 1949 that the triumphant success of Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii renamed 'Goldsturm' began. 'Goldsturm' translates to English as “gold storm.” Heinrich Hagemann, although retired, maintains an active interest in his company, the world-renowned Hagemann Staudenkulturen. A member of the Asteraceae (Compositae) family, orange coneflower or black-eyed Susan has a native range from New Jersey west to Illinois. 'Goldsturm' orange coneflower is significant in its compact habit and 1-2-inch golden-yellow petals which encircle a nearly black cone of disk flowers. The leaves are coarse, dark green lanceolate to ovate, 3-6 inches long; stem leaves are smaller, almost bract-like. The “gold storm” blankets the tops of 18-30-inch tall plants from mid-July to October. Plant width is 24 inches.

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