Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Little Goldstar’ Black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Little Goldstar’ Black-eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan or orange coneflower

This knee-high performer is a knockout in the landscape! Selected for copious floral display and dwarf habit with increased manageability, this variety has excellent branching and forms a tidy, compact clump. A bit more floriferous than ‘Goldsturm’, flowers are held high above rich green foliage and bloom from July into October.

Black-eyed Susan Interesting Notes

Black-eyed Susans need little introduction, for whether lining the roadside or the garden path, they are some of our most cherished and recognizable wildflowers. They offer an award-winning combination of bold, eye-catching flowers and an easy disposition that has made the genus popular here and abroad. These are true meadow and prairie plants that are perfectly at ease with ornamental grasses, blazing stars, and coneflowers, among others, and they have helped to popularize a new trend in gardening based on a prairie aesthetic, characterized by bold sweeps of grasses intermixed with colorful drifts of late-blooming perennials. They are good nectar plants visited by a host of butterflies and other insects, and when in bloom look as if draped in a quilt of chocolate and gold. – From The New England Wild Flower Society Guide to Growing and Propagating Wild Flowers by William Cullina

Distinguishing features of ‘Little Goldstar’ include a dwarf habit, narrow leaves, healthy green basal foliage during flowering and a vigorous, floriferous display of blooms that last into fall. Vernalization is not required to bloom; however, it is recommended to produce the highest quality finished product.

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii ‘Little Goldstar’ Growing and Maintenance Tips
Adaptable to a wide variety of soil conditions in full to partial sun. Tolerates hot, humid summers and some drought. Deadhead to prolong blooming season. Disease and pest resistant.

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Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Viette’s Little Suzy’
Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Viette’s Little Suzy’

Culture

Easily grown in dry to medium, organically rich to average, well-drained soils in full sun. Best bloom occurs in full sun, although plants will tolerate some light shade. Plants prefer consistent moisture throughout the growing season, with some tolerance for drought once established. Good air circulation is appreciated. Deadhead spent flowers to encourage additional bloom. Plants slowly spread in the garden by rhizomes.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Rudbeckia fulgida which occurs in both dry and moist soils in open woods, glades and thickets. An upright, rhizomatous, clump-forming, free-blooming coneflower which typically grows to 3′ tall, often forming colonies in the wild. Features daisy-like flowers (to 2.5″ across) with yellow rays and brownish-purple center disks. Prolific bloom production over a long mid-summer to fall bloom period. Oblong to lanceolate, medium green foliage. Good cut flower.

Genus name honors Olof Rudbeck (1630-1702) Swedish botanist and founder of the Uppsala Botanic Garden in Sweden where Carl Linnaeus was professor of botany.

Specific epithet means shining or glistening.

VIETTE’S LITTLE SUZY is a compact, upright, rhizomatous, clump-forming, free-blooming coneflower which typically grows only 10-15″ tall. Features daisy-like flowers with yellow rays and dark brownish-purple center disks. Prolific flower production over a long mid-summer-to-fall bloom period. Oblong to lanceolate, medium green foliage. Good fresh cut flower.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems.

Garden Uses

Mass in bold drifts in the perennial border, cottage garden, meadow, native plant garden or naturalized area. Provides excellent bloom and color for the late summer. Good cut flower.

A compact cultivar.

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Rudbeckia hirta – ‘Chocolate Orange’ Black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia hirta – ‘Chocolate Orange’ Black-eyed Susan

Draped in chocolate with a wrapper of gold! The brown center cone is surrounded by a smooth ring of chocolate maroon petals dipped with bold golden orange tips. This is a must-have treat for your garden. Road salt tolerant.

In meadows, along the roadside or in your garden bed, Rudbeckia are one of the most versatile and recognized perennials. Wildlife friendly. Picture-perfect punctuated with butterflies and the goldfinches will love the seed.

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Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherry Brandy’ Black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherry Brandy’ Black-eyed Susan

This striking Rudbeckia hybrid leaves the standard gold-color behind! Its shockingly-red, velvety blooms will ignite the garden with weeks and weeks of color in the summer through fall. The unique bi-color blooms, on compact, beautiful foliage, will put on a show in the front of your garden or in a container.

As the state flower of Maryland, we understand why everyone loves Black Eyed Susans. Cherry Brandy takes the classic beauty of the standard, yellow Rudbeckia and puts a unique, bright twist with rings of reds and maroons, coming into a chocolate-brown center. Plant this beauty and enjoy long-lasting blooms when much of the garden has settled down for the season.

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Rudbeckia hirta ‘Sonora’ Black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia hirta ‘Sonora’ Black-eyed Susan

This new hybrid looks a lot like the famous Gloriosa Daisy which is usually grown from seed. (We have the seed in our Wildflower Seed Dept.) However, this perennial is longer-lived than the seed-sown type (The ones from seed rarely last more than a couple of seasons.) , and all the flowers with this plant will be the same–all with the attractive dark reddish center. (The seed sown Gloriosas range from solid gold to various bi-colors and even double forms.) These new hybrids, which grow to about three feet tall, make wonderful color for your summer garden.

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Rudbeckia subtomentosa – ‘Little Henry’ Dwarf Black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia subtomentosa – ‘Little Henry’ Dwarf Black-eyed Susan

Sweet coneflower or sweet black-eyed Susan

A shorter version of the popular ‘Henry Eilers’
Delightful quilled yellow petals
Perfect for smaller landscapes
Introduced by Terra Nova Nurseries

The most darling little selection of native sweet coneflower you’ll ever see! This is a third shorter than ‘Henry Eilers’; the height has great appeal, but it is the unique petals that draw the most attention. Surrounding the traditional brown-eyed Susan cones are narrow quills that jet out all around it. A wonderfully compact, upright and vigorous introduction from Terra Nova.

Available for shipping mid May

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Rudbeckia triloba ‘Prairie Glow’
Rudbeckia triloba ‘Prairie Glow’

Rudbeckia triloba ‘Prairie Glow’

Prairie Glow Brown-Eyed Susan

‘Prairie Glow’ has irresistible flowers of burnt orange with yellow tips and a chocolate center. They flower in late summer and fall for an extended period of time and will be eagerly sought after by native bees and butterflies. The seed in the spent flowers will attract all kinds of birds. This brown-eyed Susan is easy to grow in average, moist, well-drained soils in full sun, though it is fairly drought tolerant once established. Works well planted with ornamental grasses, asters and Joe-pye weed.

Benefits

  • Attracts butterflies and many other beneficial insects
  • The seed from the spent flowers are a favorite of birds
  • Long flowering with bright blooms perfect for cutting
  • Easy to care for and fast growing
  • Drought tolerant once established
  • Deer tend to leave this plant alone

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

Deadhead spent flowers to encourage additional bloom and prevent any unwanted self-seeding. But, try to leave some spent flower heads for the birds. This Brown-Eyed Susan is considered by some to be a short lived perennial. Luckily, it has a tendency to self-seed and will generally remain in the garden and become naturalized.

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Rudbeckia triloba Three-Lobed Coneflower
Rudbeckia triloba Three-Lobed Coneflower

Three-lobed coneflower Interesting Notes

Rudbeckia triloba is a bushy, free-flowering, 2-3′ (to 5′) tall biennial or short-lived perennial that readily self sows and is very effective for naturalizing. It features masses of 1-2” wide, daisy-like, golden-yellow flowers with flat, purplish-brown centers on hairy stems from late summer to early fall. The thin, rough textured upper leaves are oval to lance-shaped and sometimes three-lobed at the base. Performance is best in moist but well-drained, humus-rich soil in full sun. Perfect for an informal garden, it also makes a good cut flower. Plant with Echinacea purpureaEutrochium maculatumConoclinium coelestinumSymphyotrichum laeve, and Vernonia novaboracensis. – Mt. Cuba Center

1997 Georgia Gold Medal Winner: Three-lobed Coneflower (Rudbeckia triloba) is a knockout in the late summer landscape with its showy floral display of bright yellow flowers. Like other Rudbeckia species, Three-lobed Coneflower is very drought – heat – and pest-tolerant. It’s an excellent choice for rock gardens, banks or other drought-prone sites. Native to the United States, Three-lobed Coneflower is well-adapted to poor soils and requires little care. It’s an excep­tional perennial for the low-maintenance gardener.

Plant Characteristics: Three-lobed Coneflower starts bloom­ing about the first week in August, and flowering continues well into September. It blooms a few weeks after Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’ and a month after the species Rudbeckia hirta is past its prime, so it’s a great plant for a garden suffering from midsummer blahs! – State Botanical Garden of Georgia, Gold Medal Plant Program

Rudbeckia triloba Growing and Maintenance Tips

Prefers sandy or loamy, moist soils, but is drought resistant. Spreads slowly by rhizomes. Deadhead to prolong blooming season. Propagate by seed, cuttings and division. Cut back to the ground after first frost and mulch to protect roots for the winter. Outstanding in mass plantings, as a border perennial, or in rock or low maintenance gardens.

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Ruellia humilis – Wild Petunia
Ruellia humilis – Wild Petunia

Host plant – Common Buckeye Butterfly

Wild petunia occurs in dryish soils in open woods, glades, prairies and fields throughout the State except for the far southeastern lowlands. Typically grows to 2′ tall. Features tubular, bell-shaped, petunia-like flowers (to 3″ long), each with five shallow rounded lobes. May to October bloom period. Lavender to lilac flowers appear singly or in clusters in the upper leaf axils. Oblong to lanceolate, olive green leaves to 4″ long. Leaves and stems are hairy. This plant in on threatened list in the state of Michigan.

Available for shipping mid May

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Salix humilis – Prairie Willow
Salix humilis – Prairie Willow

This shrub is 2-8′ tall, often branching near the base and toward the tips of older stems. Woody stems are terete and variably colored – usually some shade of yellowish tan, brown, or gray. Young woody stems are often short-pubescent, but they become glabrous with age. New shoots are light green and short-pubescent. Alternate leaves occur along young stems and shoots. The leaf blades are 1¾-4″ long and ¼-¾” across; they are narrowly lanceolate, oblanceolate, or oblong-elliptic in shape and smooth to slightly crenate along their margins. The margins are often revolute (curved downward) as well. The upper surface of the leaf blades is medium green or grayish green and glabrous to sparsely short-pubescent, while the lower surface (for this variety of Prairie Willow) is short-pubescent and sometimes whitened. The petioles are ¼-½” in length and short-pubescent. At the base of the petioles, lanceolate stipules are sometimes found.

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Sedum Telephium - Autumn Joy
Sedum telephium – ‘Autumn Joy’

The border varieties of Stonecrop are a dependable choice for the late summer and fall garden, offering foliage interest earlier in the season, then a colourful display of flowers in the fall. Autumn Joy is by far the most popular of these, a familiar sight when it begins to produce green broccoli-like buds in mid-summer, which gradually open into enormous dusty-pink flower heads, finally deepening to rich bronzy-red. Even the dead flower heads have good winter effect. In rich soils, plants may be pinched in June to prevent floppiness. A classic perennial!

Available May 2017

Grown in 4.5″ square pot.

All of our plants are grown without the use of harmful pesticides.

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Senna hebecarpa – Wild Senna
Senna hebecarpa – Wild Senna

Host Plant – Sulphur, Clouded Sulphur, Orange Sulphur

Wild Senna is a versatile plant that we think deserves more recognition as a great choice for garden or restoration projects. Its lovely, bright yellow flowers bloom July-August, attracting many bees and butterflies. Autumn brings beautiful leaf colors and the formation of long black pods with seeds favored by larger birds like wild turkeys. A horizontal root system provides strength against winds, allowing the plant’s stately (4-6′) beauty to be appreciated even after the storm. Some gardeners use this sun-loving plant to form a hedge.

It is virtually indistinguishable from its relative, Maryland Senna (Senna marilandica) until the two species have ripe seeds. The Wild Senna will readily open its pod and the seeds will fall out, whereas the Maryland Senna seed pods will stay tightly closed.  Other than this, it is very hard to tell the two species apart.

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